How Much Money Does an Entomologist Make a Year

Entomologists, scientists who study insects, earn a wide range of salaries depending on their experience, education, and job title. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual wage for entomologists was $68,580 in May 2021. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $36,250, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $117,650. Those with a bachelor’s degree typically earn less than those with a master’s or doctoral degree. Additionally, entomologists working in the private sector tend to earn more than those working in academia or government.

Salary Range of Entomologists

Entomologists study insects and their role in the ecosystem. They conduct research, develop pest management strategies, and educate the public about insects.

The salary range for entomologists varies depending on their experience, education, and location. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary for entomologists was $68,350 in May 2021. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $41,950, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $115,090.

  • Entry-level entomologists with a bachelor’s degree can expect to earn around $50,000 per year.
  • Entomologists with a master’s degree can earn between $60,000 and $80,000 per year.
  • Entomologists with a Ph.D. can earn more than $100,000 per year.

Entomologists who work in government or academia typically earn less than those who work in the private sector.

LocationMedian Annual Salary
New York$85,000
California$75,000
Texas$65,000
Florida$60,000

How Much Money Does an Entomologist Make a Year?

Entomologists are scientists who study insects. They research the biology, behavior, and ecology of insects, and their impact on the environment and human health. Entomologists work in a variety of settings, including universities, government agencies, and private companies.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary for entomologists was $63,320 in May 2021. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $38,660, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $104,690.

Factors Affecting Entomologist Salaries

Several factors can affect an entomologist’s salary, including:

  • Education: Entomologists with a master’s degree or doctorate typically earn more than those with only a bachelor’s degree.
  • Experience: Entomologists with more experience typically earn more than those with less experience.
  • Location: Entomologists working in certain parts of the country may earn more than those working in other areas.
  • Employer: Entomologists working for the government or private companies may earn more than those working for universities or nonprofit organizations.
  • Specialization: Entomologists who specialize in a particular area of entomology, such as medical entomology or forensic entomology, may earn more than those who work in general entomology.
  • The following table shows the average annual salaries for entomologists in different job settings, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics:

    Job SettingAverage Annual Salary
    Federal government$91,640
    State government$65,590
    Local government$62,900
    Private industry$64,410
    Nonprofit organizations$59,210

    Career and Salary Prospects for Entomologists

    Entomologists are scientists who study insects. They work in a variety of settings, including universities, government agencies, and private companies. Their research helps us understand the role of insects in the environment and develop strategies for controlling pests and diseases. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary for entomologists was $94,310 in May 2021. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $49,410, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $140,830.

    The highest-paying industries for entomologists are:

    • Federal government
    • State government
    • Local government
    • Colleges and universities
    • Private industry

    Government agencies hire entomologists to conduct research on pests and diseases that affect agriculture, forestry, and public health. Colleges and universities employ entomologists to teach and conduct research. Private companies hire entomologists to develop and market pest control products and services.

    The following table shows the median annual salary for entomologists in different industries:

    IndustryMedian Annual Salary
    Federal government$103,350
    State government$92,850
    Local government$89,520
    Colleges and universities$87,380
    Private industry$85,690

    How Much Money Does an Entomologist Make a Year?

    Entomologists, also known as insect scientists, study insects and their impact on the environment and human health. They play a vital role in research, conservation, and pest management. The earning potential for entomologists varies depending on factors such as experience, level of education, and industry. Here’s an overview of salary expectations for entomologists and career advancement opportunities in the field:

    Salary Expectations for Entomologists

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary for entomologists was $64,810 in May 2021. The lowest 10% earned less than $44,640, and the highest 10% earned more than $107,160.

    Salaries may vary based on industry and employer:

    • Federal Government: $102,610 (average annual wage for zoologists and wildlife biologists, including entomologists)
    • State and Local Government: $74,840
    • Private Industry: $66,100
    • Academia: $60,000 (average annual salary for assistant professors of entomology)

    Career Advancement Opportunities for Entomologists

    Entomologists can advance their careers through various pathways, including:

    1. Research: Entomologists with advanced degrees can pursue careers in research and development at universities, government agencies, and private companies.
    2. Pest Management: Entomologists can work as pest control specialists, pest management consultants, or researchers in the field of agricultural pest management.
    3. Education: Entomologists with a passion for teaching can pursue careers as educators at universities, colleges, or secondary schools.
    4. Outreach and Extension: Entomologists can work as outreach specialists or extension agents, connecting with the public to educate them about insects and inform them about pest management practices.
    5. Government: Entomologists can work in government agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture, to develop and implement insect control programs.
    6. Alright folks, that’s all for now on the juicy details of how much dough anologist rake in annually. Thanks for sticking around. If you’re still curious about the financial lives of other professions, be sure to check back in with us. We’ve got the inside scoop on all the money-making secrets, so stay tuned!