How Do I File Taxes if I Live in Missouri and Work in Kansas

State Income Tax Laws for Residents vs Non-Residents

When it comes to filing taxes, the state you live in and the state you work in can impact your tax liability. Missouri and Kansas have different income tax laws for residents and non-residents. Here’s a breakdown of the key differences:

Residents

  • Missouri: Residents of Missouri pay income tax on all of their income, regardless of where it is earned.
  • Kansas: Residents of Kansas pay income tax on all of their income earned in Kansas, but they receive a credit for income taxes paid to other states.

Non-Residents

  • Missouri: Non-residents of Missouri pay income tax only on the income they earn in Missouri.
  • Kansas: Non-residents of Kansas pay income tax only on the income they earn in Kansas.
StateResidentsNon-Residents
MissouriPay income tax on all incomePay income tax on income earned in Missouri
KansasPay income tax on income earned in Kansas and receive a credit for taxes paid to other statesPay income tax on income earned in Kansas

If you live in Missouri and work in Kansas, you will need to file a tax return in both states. You will pay income tax to Missouri on all of your income, and you will pay income tax to Kansas on the income you earn in Kansas. However, you will receive a credit on your Kansas tax return for the income taxes you paid to Missouri.

Filing taxes can be complex, so it is important to understand the tax laws of the states you live and work in. If you have any questions, you should consult with a tax professional.

Withholding Tax Obligations in Multiple States

When you live in one state and work in another, you may have withholding tax obligations in both states. This can be a complex issue, but there are some general rules that can help you understand your responsibilities.

  • The state where you live (your resident state) has the right to tax all of your income, regardless of where it is earned.
  • The state where you work (your non-resident state) has the right to tax the income that you earn within its borders.

If you live in Missouri and work in Kansas, you will need to file tax returns in both states. You will need to pay taxes to Missouri on all of your income, and you will need to pay taxes to Kansas on the income that you earn in Kansas.

To avoid paying taxes on the same income in both states, you can claim a credit on your Missouri tax return for the taxes that you pay to Kansas. This will reduce the amount of taxes that you owe to Missouri.

Missouri Withholding Tax Rates

Filing StatusWithholding Rate
Single3%
Married, filing jointly6%
Married, filing separately3%
Head of household4.5%

You can use the Missouri Department of Revenue’s withholding calculator to determine how much state income tax you should be withholding from your paycheck.

Kansas Withholding Tax Rates

Filing StatusWithholding Rate
Single3%
Married, filing jointly6%
Married, filing separately3%
Head of household4.5%

You can use the Kansas Department of Revenue’s withholding calculator to determine how much state income tax you should be withholding from your paycheck.

Filing State and Federal Taxes with Multi-State Income

If you live in Missouri but work in Kansas, you need to file both state and federal income taxes. Here’s how to do it:

  • Federal taxes: You will need to file a federal income tax return using Form 1040. You can use the IRS website to find the form and instructions.
  • Missouri taxes: You will need to file a Missouri income tax return using Form MO-1040. You can find the form and instructions on the Missouri Department of Revenue website.
  • Kansas taxes: You will need to file a Kansas income tax return using Form KS-40. You can find the form and instructions on the Kansas Department of Revenue website.

When filing your taxes, you will need to report all of your income, regardless of which state you earned it in. You will also need to claim any deductions and credits that you are eligible for.

If you have income from multiple states, you may need to pay taxes to both states. However, you can avoid paying taxes on the same income twice by using the following methods:

  • Itemized deductions: You can deduct certain expenses on your federal income tax return, even if you have already deducted them on your state income tax return.
  • Standard deduction: The standard deduction is a set amount that you can deduct from your taxable income. The standard deduction is the same for all taxpayers, regardless of which state they live in.
  • Tax credits: Tax credits are dollar-for-dollar reductions of your tax liability. You can claim tax credits on both your federal and state income tax returns.

If you have any questions about filing your taxes, you should consult with a tax professional.

Helpful Resources

ResourceLink
IRS websitehttps://www.irs.gov/
Missouri Department of Revenue websitehttps://dor.mo.gov/
Kansas Department of Revenue websitehttps://www.kansasrevenue.org/

Crediting Taxes Paid to Other States

When you live in one state and work in another, it’s important to understand how to credit the taxes you’ve paid to each state. This will help you avoid paying taxes twice on the same income.

In the case of Missouri and Kansas, Missouri allows a credit for taxes paid to Kansas. This means that you can reduce your Missouri tax liability by the amount of taxes you’ve already paid to Kansas.

  • To claim the credit, you’ll need to file a Missouri income tax return and attach a Schedule MO-K. The Schedule MO-K allows you to calculate the credit you are eligible to receive.
  • The credit is available for individual income taxes only.
  • The credit is not refundable. This means that you can only use it to reduce your Missouri tax liability to zero. Any excess credit will not be refunded to you.

    The following table provides a summary of the crediting rules for Missouri and Kansas:

    StateCredit for Taxes Paid to Other States
    MissouriYes, for individual income taxes only
    KansasNo

    Well, there you have it, folks! Hopefully, all your questions about filing taxes as a Missouri resident working in Kansas are answered. I know taxes can be a real headache, but understanding the rules and regulations can make a big difference.

    Thanks for taking the time to read, and don’t be a stranger! Swing by again sometime if you have any more tax-related questions or need a good laugh. Until then, keep calm and tax on!